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Little Canfield to Great Waltham and Great Easton Loop Cycle Route



England > Essex > Bishops Stortford
Print this routePrint   Download this cycle route in GPX FormatGPX
Cycle Route Details
Route NameLittle Canfield to Great Waltham and Great Easton Loop
Distance : miles (km)35.37  (56.92)
Duration(hh:mm)03:30
Difficulty
Posted ByGemma
Calories Burned kcal
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Cycle Route Location
CountryEngland
Town/CityBishops Stortford
County/RegionEssex
Start LocationLittle Canfield
End LocationLittle Canfield
Cycle Steps
This is a fairly flat route that is mainly on quiet country roads, with two short sections of B road and an even shorter section of A road.
Ride out through Great Canfield towards High Roding and cross the Dunmow Road (B184) onto Rands Road. Then head towards Broomfield, passing through High and Good Easter. In Good Easter turn left into Mill Road and head towards Great Waltham. Just before Great Waltham turn into Bury Lane and then left towards Pleshey. In Pleshey take Grange Road and head up through Bishop's Green to Branston. Through Barnston turn left onto the A130 and cross the A120 into Dunmow. Go straight through Great Dunmow on the B184. At Butcher's Pasture turn off into Duck Street and on through the Eastons. Turn left into Folly Mill Lane and left again onto the B1051. Follow this till the turn off for Broxted and head through Molehill and Bomber's Green back to Little Canfield.
Landmarks/Pubs for lunch/Sites to see?
Cycle shop in Gt Dunmow, Easton Manor and a lot of village pubs along route.

Near By Cycle Shops
Flitch Bikes Ltd
Your comments?
posted by:30639Rating : difficult :
Great route, lots of country lanes and very little traffic and only few hills. Only problem is that there are very few waypoints in the GPX file. I have uploaded the same route as Little Canfield v2 as saved by my Garmin Edge


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